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Kirock

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyjo

 

....and I will love him an hug him an squeeze him an call him George...

 

I WANT one!!!

 

LOL! NJ! You were the first person I thought of when I saw that picture. Somehow I knew you were going to like "George," he looks so much like a cuddly pug!

Kirock

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Lost World of New Species Found in Jungle

Part II

Here are some more animal pictures from from the above article about the recent discover or the "The Garden of Eden" in the Foja Mountains of Indonesia, including a new picture of "George."

Mammal expert Kris Helgen holds a golden-mantled tree kangaroo. Many of the newly discovered animals have no natural fear of humans.

A golden-fronted bowerbird, in the first photographic record of the species, is one of dozens of animals found in an Indonesian jungle dubbed "Lost World."

The scientists said they discovered 20 frog species, including a tiny frog less than a half-inch long, as well as four butterfly species and at least five palm plants.

Before the animals can officially be classified as new species, scientists will have to publish findings for review. The process could take six months to several years.

Kirock

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New Assassin Spider Species

 

More Assassin Spider Species Found

USA Today, Staff Writers

February 13, 2006

 

Researchers exploring the forest of the African island nation of Madagascar have discovered that tiny assassin spiders, unusual-looking bugs that prey on other spiders, are more diverse than previously thought. Nine newly discovered assassin spider species could shed light on how the insect evolved, say scientists with the California Academy of Sciences. They collected more than 1 million bugs, including the new spider species, during a four-year expedition on the island. Assassin spiders, about a dozen species of which were previously know, are notorious for stabbing helpless spiders with venom-filled fangs attached to their super-sized jaws. They also possess very long necks so they can attack their prey from a distance.

waltcesca

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Photos taken of 'living fossil' in Laos

Thu Jun 15, 9:05 PM ET

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - The first pictures showing a live specimen of a rodent species once thought to have been extinct for 11 million years have been taken by a retired Florida State University professor and a Thai wildlife biologist.

They took video and still photographs of the "living fossil," which looks like a small squirrel or tree shrew, in May during an expedition to central Laos near the Thai border.

Known as Diatomyidae, scientists have nicknamed it the Laotian rock rat. The creature is not really a rat but a member of a rodent family once known only from fossils.

The pictures show a docile, squirrel-sized animal with dark dense fur and a long tail but not as bushy as a squirrel's. It also shows that the creature waddles like a duck with its hind feet splayed out at an angle — ideal for climbing rocks.

"I hope these pictures will help in some way to prevent the loss of this marvelous animal," said David Redfield, a science education professor emeritus.

He and Uthai Treesucon, a bird-watching colleague, befriended hunters who captured a live rock rat after four failed attempts. They returned the animal, which the locals call kha-nyou, to its rocky home after photographing it.

The long-whiskered rodent was branded as a new species last year when biologists first examined dead specimens they found being sold at meat markets. But they had never seen a live animal until Redfield and Treesucon photographed it.

"These images are extremely important scientifically, showing as they do an animal (with) such markedly distinctive anatomical and functional attributes," said Mary Dawson, curator emeritus of vertebrate paleontology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.

Dawson and colleagues in France and China first reported the rock rat's true identity in the March 10 edition of the journal Science after they compared the bones of present-day specimens with fossils found in Asia.


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