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Kirock

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Ancient Tunnels From Jewish Revolt Found

USA Today, Staff Writers

Wednesday, March 14, 2006

 

Archaeologists working in northern Israel said Monday that they have uncovered chambers and tunnels used during a Jewish revolt against the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago. The chambers, discovered at the Israeli Arab village of Kfar Kana, north of Nazareth, were hidden directly beneath the floors of above ground homes and would have served as concealed subterranean homes. Yardenna Alexandre of the Israel Antiquities Authority said the find shows the ancient Jews planned and prepared for the uprising, in contrast to the common perception that the revolt began spontaneously. The revolt against Roman rule in A.D. 66-70 ended when the Romans sacked Jerusalem and destroyed the Second Temple.

 

 

Aerial view of underground tunnels in Israel dating from

2,000 years ago. Israeli Antiquities Authority via AP.

 

Read more about it at this link.

 

 Ancient Israeli Archaeological Finds

 

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Second Royal Mayan Tomb Found At Waka'

USA Today, Staff Writers

Tuesday, May 2, 2006

 

Archaeologists have discovered a royal tomb hidden inside a Maya pyramid in Guatemala. Project co-director Hector Escobedo of Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala and student Juan Carlos Melendez uncovered the collapsed tomb last week at the Maya center of Waka'. The tomb probably dates from A.D. 200 to A.D. 400, says project co-director David Freidel of Southern Methodist University in Dallas. It may be the tomb of the founder of Waka' or K'inich B'alam the First, a Maya king from about A.D. 378, Freidel says. Researchers found a queen's tomb inside a nearby pyramid in 2004.

 

 

The wife of Waka' king K'inich Balam was an ix kolomte, empress or female war lord. Her stela celebrates the accession of Yich' aak K'ak'--possibly her brother--in A.D. 682.

 

Mayan Tomb At Waka

waltcesca

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Thieves lead to discovery of Egypt tombs By SIERRA MILLMAN, Associated Press Writer

1 hour, 49 minutes ago

 

 

 

SAQQARA, Egypt - The arrest of tomb robbers led archaeologists to the graves of three royal dentists, protected by a curse and hidden in the desert sands for thousands of years in the shadow of Egypt's most ancient pyramid, officials announced Sunday.

 

The thieves launched their own dig one summer night two months ago but were apprehended, Zahi Hawass, chief of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, told reporters.

 

That led archaeologists to the three tombs, one of which included an inscription warning that anyone who violated the sanctity of the grave would be eaten by a crocodile and a snake, Hawass said.

 

A towering, painted profile of the chief dentist stares down at passers-by from the wall opposite the inscription.

 

The tombs date back more than 4,000 years to the 5th Dynasty and were meant to honor a chief dentist and two others who treated the pharaohs and their families, Hawass said.

 

Their location near the Step Pyramid of King Djoser — believed to be Egypt's oldest pyramid — indicate the respect accorded dentists by Egypt's ancient kings, who "cared about the treatment of their teeth," Hawass said.

 

Although their services were in demand by the powerful, the dentists likely did not share in their wealth.

 

The tombs, which did not contain their mummies, were built of mud-brick and limestone, not the pure limestone preferred by ancient Egypt's upper class.

 

"The whole point of a tomb was to last forever," said Carol Redmount, associate professor of Egyptian archaeology at the University of California at Berkeley. "So you wanted to make it out of materials that would last forever. And mud-brick ... didn't last forever."

 

During a visit to the site, Hawass pointed out two hieroglyphs — an eye over a tusk — which appear frequently among the neat rows of symbols decorating the tombs. He said those hieroglyphs identify the men as dentists.

 

The pictorial letters also spell out the names of the chief dentist — Iy Mry — and the other two — Kem Msw and Sekhem Ka. Hawass said the men were not related but must have been partners or colleagues to have been buried together.

 

Figures covering the pillars in the doorway of the chief dentist's tomb tell archaeologists much about his life and habits, Hawass said.

 

They depict the chief dentist and his family immersed in daily rituals — playing games, slaughtering animals and presenting offerings to the dead, including the standard 1,000 loaves of bread and 1,000 vases of beer.

 

These would "magically provide food and sustenance for the spirit of the dead person for all eternity," Redmount said.

 

Just around the corner of the doorway is a false door, its face painstakingly inscribed with miniature hieroglyphics. A shallow basin was placed below it.

 

"That was sort of the interface where the dead person in the tomb would come up and interact with the living," Redmount said.

 

The tomb robbers were the first to discover the site two months ago, and began their own dig one summer night, before they were captured and jailed. "We have to thank the thieves," Hawass said.

 

Although archaeologists have been exploring Egypt's ruins intensively for more than 150 years, Hawass believes only 30 percent of what lies hidden beneath the sands has been uncovered. Excavation continues at Saqqara, he said, and his team expects to find more tombs in the area.

 

Saqqara, about 12 miles south of Cairo, is one of Egypt's most popular tourist sites and hosts a collection of temples, tombs and funerary complexes.

 

The Step Pyramid is the forerunner of the more familiar straight-sided pyramids in Giza on the outskirts of Cairo, which were believed to have been built about a century later.


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nannyjo

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So, I really just have to ask...

 

What's the difference between thieves digging up the tomb and taking everything and archeaologists digging up the tomb and taking everything?


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waltcesca

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lol, uhhhh, Thieves take from the graves to increase THEIR wealth, while Archaeologists take from the graves to increase OTHERS wealth (AND theirs)!


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MACJR

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Quote:
Originally Posted by waltcesca

lol, uhhhh, Thieves take from the graves to increase THEIR wealth, while Archaeologists take from the graves to increase OTHERS wealth (AND theirs )!

Professional archaeologists are more likely to handle the ancient artifacts correctly to preserve them and then share what they learn from their finds with the world. A thief will generally just hack out what they want, and then grab, run, sell, and usually the only ones who learns from the stolen ancient artifacts are the less honest wealthy people who buy them. The only way the general public wins from stolen artifacts is if an honest person then ends up with the artifacts at some point, but by then, most of the history of the stolen objects, and the site they came from, are lost to history.

 

There is a lot of time and effort, and money, put into preserving a site once the archaeologists remove the treasures. The looters will just let the place turn to dust once they grab whatever they think will make them a few bucks.

 

And speaking of thieves, I wonder if they were thanked before, or after, they were fed to the crocodiles and snake? 

 

 

MACJR


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I am going to have a viking funeral so my stuff will be burned with me

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waltcesca

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Tsunami link to Dwarka end

Chennai, April 14: Krishna’s mythological city of Dwarka may have been destroyed by a tsunami 3,000 years ago, a group of ocean scientists have claimed.

The Indian version of the ancient Greek legend of “Lost Atlantis” was offered at a recent seminar here by a team from the National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT), Chennai.

Researcher D. Venkata Rao suggested that undersea ruins in the Gulf of Cambay off Gujarat are the debris of a city that suffered a “tectonic upheaval similar to the December 2004 tsunami that submerged the entire landmass”.

The discovery of the ruins in 1999-2004 by the institute had set off a heated debate whether they were the remnants of Krishna’s Dwarka.

The then HRD minister, Murli Manohar Joshi of the BJP, had claimed the ruins were 9,500 years old and would lead to a rewriting of world history, crowning a Hindu India as the cradle of civilisation over the claims of Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Indus valley.

Rao and research partner B. Sasisekaran, however, dated the undersea finds to around 2280 BC, citing tests on a piece of pottery they had sent to Oxford University.

They said more evidence was needed to establish whether the finds were indeed the ruins of the city of Dwarka mentioned in the Mahabharat.

But there was sufficient evidence, they said, that an ancient city at the site was swallowed up by the sea sometime around 1000 BC.

Their paper, presented at the international symposium on “Indus civilisation and Tamil language”, cited independent seismic surveys by Manipur University and the Deccan College of Archaeology, Pune.

Both teams had suggested that the region, off Shivali and Hazira on the Gujarat coast, had suffered “major tectonic upheavals” around 3000 BC, 1000 BC and AD 550. Given the period to which the city has been dated, it’s the second of these earthquakes that would have destroyed it, Rao said.

“We revisited the area and covered (it) by site scan, through underwater high resolution seabed photography and even mapped the sea floor,” Rao said.

The NIOT then did its own seismic studies and found that the sea floor bore the signature of several upheavals.

“The seismic sections depict that the area had undergone intense folding and faulting. The layers are sheared and conspicuously absent with several features of faulting at surface and subsurface,” Rao said quoting from the paper.

He added that the seismic activity “seems to undergo periodic reactivation, resulting in many neo-tectonic activities affecting the seabed”.

The NIOT’s study suggested the tsunami waves unleashed by these earthquakes might have been up to 12 metres tall.

From the artefacts the institute recovered from the seabed, it sent a piece of pottery to the Luminescence Dating Laboratory at Oxford University. “It gave a calibrated date of 4,287 years Before Present (around 2,280 BC) for the pottery piece,” Rao said.

“The date led us to surmise that this part of the land might have had trade links with some area falling under the Indus valley civilisation.”

Rao cited another significant find. “A clay seal, a glyptic, without words found at Cambay is identical with glyptics from Mohenjodaro.”

The seal, a piece of baked clay with an impression, “was found on one of the walls made of wattle and daub recovered through dredge”.

Rao and Sasisekaran, who were helped by NIOT director S. Kathiroli and numismatics expert S. Srinivasan, theorise that there may have been a migration from the Indus valley to the Gujarat coast.

As for the Dwarka theory, they cite how the Mahabharat and the Brihatkatha — believed to have been written in the second century BC — mentions Dwarka being washed undersea.


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